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Using mscreen and Century products

Before configuring mscreen, you will need to carefully consider the following questions:
  1. What emulation will you be using?
  2. How many sessions will you need?

Setup procedures

Step 1:

TinyTERM for Windows or TERM:

Run TERM. Press <ALT>e, or <ALT><F1>|Configure|Emulation. The Emulation setup screen should now be displayed. Change the screen pages setting to the number of sessions you will need (Question #2 above). Enter <ALT>q, or <ALT><F1>|quit. You will be asked if you wish to save the changes you have just made. Answer yes to this question. You will now be asked if you wish to exit TERM. Answer yes to this question also.

TinyTERM for DOS:

Run ttsetup, select Emulation. Change the screen pages setting to the number of sessions you will need (Question #2 above). Save these settings and exit ttsetup.

Step 2:

Connect to your Unix or XENIX host in the usual manner, using TERM or TinyTERM.

Step 3:

By default mscreen will look in the file /etc/mscreencap for the terminal capabilities. If you are using a different file you will need to set the MSCREENCAP environment variable to the file you will be using.

Step 4:

Start mscreen on the Unix (or XENIX) host:

mscreen -n 6

The number of sessions, 6, could be less, but not higher; TERM and TinyTERM will only support up to 6 screens. On some systems you will need to add the -t option to the above command line, in order to get mscreen to work.

Step 5:

If all went well, you should see a screen similar to the following...

mscreen rev VII
who is S-F7
help is S-F8
stop is S-F9
quit is S-F10
ttyp0 is S-F1
ttyp1 is S-F2
ttyp2 is S-F3
ttyp3 is S-F4
ttyp4 is S-F5
ttyp5 is S-F6

The actual keys may be different, but key assignment should be shown in this manner.

Notes: If you will be using ANSI terminal emulation, it is possible that an ANSI entry does not exist in the mscreencap. If this is the case, you can append the following entries to this file, or simply set the MSCREENCAP environment variable to point to this file.

ansi|term63:\
:who,CSF7,\E[\\:\
:help,CSF8,\E[],:\
:stop,CSF9,\E[\^,:\
:quit,CSF10,\E[_:\
:,CSF1,\E[w,\E[1z:\
:,CSF2,\E[x,\E[2z:\
:,CSF3,\E[y,\E[3z:\
:,CSF4,\E[z,\E[4z:\
:,CSF5,\E[@,\E[5z:\
:,CSF6,\E[[,\E[6z:

By default these entries will work if you are using the <CTRL><SHIFT> key combinations and no other changes should be necessary.

If you wish to use the <ALT> key combination for switching between sessions, for exact console emulation, you will need to append the following entries to the mscreencap file, or simply set the MSCREENCAP environment variable to point to this file.

ansi|term63:\
:who,A-F7,\E[7z,:\
:help,A-F8,\E[8z,:\
:stop,A-F9,\E[9z,:\
:quit,A-F10,\E[0z,:\
:,A-F1,\E[1z,\E[1z:\
:,A-F2,\E[2z,\E[2z:\
:,A-F3,\E[3z,\E[3z:\
:,A-F4,\E[4z,\E[4z:\
:,A-F5,\E[5z,\E[5z:\
:,A-F6,\E[6z,\E[6z:

You will also need to add the following lines to your TERM.RC or TT.RC file to contain:

setkey af1 "\e[1z"
setkey af2 "\e[2z"
setkey af3 "\e[3z"
setkey af4 "\e[4z"
setkey af5 "\e[5z"
setkey af6 "\e[6z"
setkey af7 "\e[7z"
setkey af8 "\e[8z"
setkey af9 "\e[9z"
setkey af10 "\e[0z"

Most Unix or XENIX systems have a detailed help section on mscreen in the on-line man pages. It is a good idea to take a look at this for additional options that may be important in your operating environment.

Trouble shooting: If you experience problems with the ANSI entries working, try the following:

Move the ANSI sequences to the beginning of the mscreencap file. The reason for this move is that there is a limitation on the size of the mscreencap file. Entries past this limit are simply ignored.

Set the MSCREENCAP environment variable to point to a file that has only the above ANSI entry. An example would be:

MSCREENCAP=/etc/mscreen.ans; export MSCREENCAP
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